“I want to take care of you.”

In this week’s #LAPLovenotes, I’m sharing a snippet from Thorn’s and Roses.

“Thanks for forcing me to take today off,” she murmured, a soft smile curving her lips. “I enjoyed being with you today, the conversation, food, wine and the fact that I could forget all my worries.”

“I’m glad you enjoyed yourself. You should take more time off,” Chuma replied, smiling back at her. 

She remained standing there, as if immobilised. With the wind scattering her hair over her face, her creamy skin glowing in the illumination provided by the setting sun and the flush on her face, she looked almost ethereal. 

Chuma stood beside her and inhaled deeply.

“I want to take care of you,” he said, his voice deep and low.

I hope you enjoyed it.

Please leave a comment.

BUYING LINKS:

Nook:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thorns-and-roses-amaka-azie/1125829381?ean=2940154019863

Kobo:

https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/thorns-and-roses-1

Amazon UK:

http://bit.ly/ThornsandRoses-AmazonUK

Amazon US: 

http://bit.ly/ThornsandRoses-AmazonUS

Okadabooks:

https://okadabooks.com/book/about/thorns_and_roses/13261

Smashwords:

http://bit.ly/ThornsandRoses-Smashwords

iBooks:

http://bit.ly/ThornsAndRosesApple

Roving Heights: 

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Out now! Be My Valentine

Out Now!

Be my Valentine by Love Africa Press is out.

5 amazing authors

5 wonderful stories

5 ways to fall in love this Valentines season.

Here’s a little teaser from one of the stories, Unexpected Love by Amaka Azie. Enjoy.

Be My Valentine

He chuckled. Although amused, his interest piqued. He’d wondered that himself. “And why are you? Still single, I mean. You are beautiful and intelligent. Some man should have snagged you up by now.”

Silence. Her face fell, and she appeared disconcerted. He immediately remembered her botched marriage proposal at Enugu and felt like a heel.

“I am sorry—”

“Never mind. It’s been like ages ago …” she muttered, gulping her drink as though trying to flush down her mortification with alcohol.

“Do you still love him?” he asked, holding his breath.

Even though unsure why he’d enquired about her ex, he was now anxious for her response, desperately hoping to hear her say no.

Yemi hesitated, swirling the drink in her glass with concentration. It appeared she wasn’t going to answer, and his stomach tumbled. Worried he had offended her by asking such a personal question, he parted his lips to apologise again when he heard her husky voice.

“No,” she said. “Not anymore.”

A deep feeling of relief surged through his chest, so intense that he almost felt faint with it.
“I probably never really did,” she continued, her tone quiet and reflective. “I think I hung onto the idea of forever with him because he is the only man that ever paid any attention to me … I guess I wanted to have somebody to love so badly that I ignored all the warning signs that flashed in front of me while we dated.”

She chewed her lower lip, bringing his attention to the full lusciousness of her mouth. An almost overwhelming need to kiss her gripped him. He had to squeeze the stem of his glass tightly to keep himself from reaching for her and drawing her to him.

Her next words cut through his sensual thoughts.

“I mean, he never introduced me to his family, his friends. The relationship seemed all one-sided. And everyone could see it but me. I feel so foolish …”

Overwhelmed with the need to touch her, he gave in to the desire and reached for her hand. He squeezed her delicate soft palms in his large hands.

Her gaze jumped to his. They reflected surprise. But something else … a connection. She could feel what he felt, too. That strong pull. The chemistry.

Without a doubt, Vincent knew he wanted this woman to be his. Not in the casual way he usually related with women. He wanted her as his girlfriend.

Purchase Links

Love Africa Press: https://www.loveafricapress.com/product-page/be-my-valentine-volume-one
Okadabooks: https://okadabooks.com/book/about/be_my_valentine_a_love_africa_press_collection/25725
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/921736
Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NDHCVP2
Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07NDHCVP2
Amazon CA: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07NDHCVP2
Amazon AU: https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B07NDHCVP2
Amazon FR: https://www.amazon.fr/dp/B07NDHCVP2

Add to Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43465485-be-my-valentine

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Breakup to Makeup- Thorns and Roses

Hello everyone.

It’s always heartbreaking to witness a marriage proposal being rejected. I always wonder what happens to the relationship after that. Can the relationship be salvaged? 

In the only one I’ve ever witnessed, the couple went their separate ways. 

In Thorns and Roses, Ifeoma turned Chuma down in what I thought was a sweet marriage proposal.

Here is another instalment of my teaser series— Breakup to Make up. Enjoy.


Thorns and Roses

A few minutes after they left the restaurant, they arrived at their destination. Chuma led her out of the jeep towards a building. Ifeoma followed closely beside him, holding his hand.

She stopped when she saw the sign that said Eastern Delight hoisted on the ground floor of a three-storey complex building. Appearing puzzled, she turned towards him.


“What’s going on?”


“Just follow me,” Chuma said, leading her into the building.


“Follow me to the kitchen,” he said.


Ifeoma froze as soon as she stepped inside. It was a beautiful modern restaurant with mahogany tables and chairs neatly arranged, silk table clothes spread across the tables and lovely floral arrangements on the centre of each table.

Before she could respond to his prompting, he took her hand and led her to an even more fascinating kitchen where three yam pounders, multiple fancy kitchen equipments, including two large cookers, were strategically placed.


“I bought what I think you need but we can add anything else that you want,” Chuma was saying, but Ifeoma hardly heard a thing. Her mind was reeling from shock.


“Ifeoma Okafor, this is all yours,” he said, holding out a bunch of keys towards her. “All paid for in your name.”

Ifeoma was still speechless, her eyes widened in astonishment, her heart fluttering.


“Ify, I was there this afternoon. I know about Mr Peters. Trust me, he will never bother you again. I will never let anyone hurt you again.”
Getting down on a knee, Chuma brought out a box from his shirt pocket. He opened it and Ifeoma gasped. A huge diamond ring dazzled her vision.

Will you marry me, Ify?” he asked simply because he was a simple man. Always direct, he did not know how to use any other approach.

She stared blankly at him for a few seconds, then turned and fled.

Cursing, Chuma got to his feet speedily and pursued her. He caught her in his arms before she could get far. They were in the middle of the empty restaurant.

“Let go of me!” she screeched. 

Chuma dropped his hands. Ifeoma escaped his embrace and began to pace the room.“

“You were there this afternoon? How do you know about Mr Peters?” Ifeoma asked, panting heavily, eyes wide in shock.

“I found out about him, about what he did to you, I’m sorry for what he did. He will never bother you again.” Chuma’s tone was calm, even though he felt the direct opposite.

Ifeoma paused her pacing as if suddenly having an epiphany.

“Mr Peters … his face … did you … did you do it?” she asked, eyeing him sceptically.

“Not personally, but I was there when it happened.” Chuma did not bother to conceal that truth. “I wanted them to do worse, to break his neck.”

“Did you tell him to… to—”

“Yes! Ifeoma, yes!” Chuma answered indignantly. “I told him to stay away from you.” He noticed the repulsion on Ifeoma’s face, and then added. “I don’t regret it, I don’t apologise. I will do anything to protect you.”

“Protect me!” she cried in disbelief. “You think losing the restaurant I worked so hard for is protecting me?” Ifeoma shook with the rage that swept through her entire body. Chuma said nothing.

“You are a controlling, manipulative asshole, and I will never marry you!” Ifeoma pointed angrily at him as she spoke.

Flinching inwardly at her words, Chuma remained still. A deep-seated fear that he was losing her made his insides burn. Many women had called him an asshole. It was nothing new. Until now, he had actually thought nothing of being called that because he knew it was the truth. Even his family frequently called him an asshole. But hearing it coming from Ifeoma’s mouth was like a knife to his heart.

“I did all of this for you! Ify, can’t you see that?”

Chuma drew closer to Ifeoma, desperate to make her see how much she meant to him. He couldn’t lose her. She backed away.

“No, you did it for yourself. To control me. I will not allow you to control me!” she snarled, her nostrils flaring. Just then, the front door to the restaurant burst open.

“Congratulations!”

The loud sound of cheering from the door interrupted them. Ifeoma and Chuma glanced simultaneously at the entrance.

Nnamdi, Adaora, Chioma, and Ngozi walked in cheering loudly with flowers and champagne bottles in their hands. Adaora held a big banner with congratulations on your engagement written boldly across it. They seemed to halt in unison as soon as they properly observed the expressions on Ifeoma and Chuma’s faces.

“You got my sisters involved?” Ifeoma turned towards him, her voice saturated with fury.

“I wanted to make this a wonderful night for you, believe me, Ify, I did this all for you,” he replied, running his palm over his shaved head. The vein at the side of his head became more prominent. 

“Should we leave?” Adaora asked hesitantly. 

The atmosphere was awkward and full of tension.

“No, I’ll leave,” Ifeoma said, her tone low, her eyes not straying from his face. 

“Stay away from me,” she said to him as she took off her shoes and ran out into the night, leaving him staring after her.

Purchase links

Amazon Us: http://bit.ly/ThornsandRoses-AmazonUS

Amazon uk : http://bit.ly/ThornsandRoses-AmazonUK

OkadaBooks: https://okadabooks.com/book/about/thorns_and_roses/13261

iTunes : http://bit.ly/ThornsAndRosesApple

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/thorns-and-roses-1

Smashwords: http://bit.ly/ThornsandRoses-Smashwords

Barnes&Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thorns-and-roses-amaka-azie/1125829381?ean=2940154019863

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I need your votes

Happy new year!

This year is already off to a great start. I’ve been nominated for The African Author Of The Year 2018 by Ufere Awards. Yay!

Link to vote below ⬇️

https://www.rwowa.org/best-author

It’s an honour to be nominated alongside other awesome authors. This is a dream come true. I started my journey after another wonderful author, Tolulope Popoola, encouraged me to dust off my manuscripts and go for it. Since then, I haven’t looked back.

Thanks for buying my books, reading them, talking about them and reviewing them. I’m grateful for all your support.

Now, I need your votes to get this award. Please click the link below to vote. Thanks.

https://www.rwowa.org/best-author

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Cover reveal- The Governor’s Wife

The cover of The Governor’s Wife is finally here! Yay!

Blurb

Newly separated Ogonna Moneke has come to Abuja to open a safe house for abused women. Luck is on her side when the perfect site falls into her lap…until she learns who owns it. The chances of Philip Adamu renting to her are slim to none. Why would he when she dropped her financially struggling college sweetheart like a hot potato to marry someone else?

Real estate tycoon Philip Adamu can’t believe his eyes when Ogonna struts into his office. Seven years earlier, the gold digger had kicked him to the curb to marry a wealthy politician. Now she needs him, more like needs his property. Vowing not to rent her so much as a dog house, Philip shows Ogonna the door. But can he resist the feelings he’s denied for so long when he sees her flirting with a rival developer?

Sparks fly the moment they meet again. But he’s engaged and she’s still hiding the dangerous secret about her marriage.

Can love and forgiveness overcome the lies and deceptions?

Can they trust each other and the future they’d once dreamt of?

Coming Soon…

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Blind date disasters: Any deal breakers?

Hello everyone.

I’m currently working on a romance fiction novella. I wrote a scene yesterday that made me chuckle. It reminded me of a horrible blind date I experienced in Enugu, where the nice looking thirty-three year old man I was set up with, told me in a very serious voice that he would never marry a woman his mother didn’t approve of.

Now, I get that people have little mental tick boxes of what they can or can not accept in a future partner, but it was a first date and I didn’t feel it was appropriate telling me that the very first time we met. To be honest, it was a deal breaker for me. I think it’s because I worry about guys whose mothers influence majority of their decisions.

Have you ever had a horrible blind date? Care to share?

 Below is an excerpt of the scene I wrote. I hope you like it. (It’s not yet edited, so, be gentle.)

Gobsmacked, Yemi stared at the man in front of her, unable to believe what she just heard. Where does mum find these men?

“Pardon?” she asked, lowering her fork to her plate, her appetite suddenly diminished.

“I said, if a woman can’t cook a good pot of soup with a thousand Naira, she is not prepared to marry.”

Yemi laughed. “You are joking, right?” she said, lifting her cutlery piece again and digging into her plate of jollof rice. He had to be kidding. Surely, no person could say something so absurd without intending to be humorous.

“I am dead serious. I always set this test for women before I date them…to see if they are wife material,” Dare replied, smiling. His grin exposed perfectly shaped white teeth on a ruggedly handsome face. A shame. For someone so good-looking, his thinking process was gravely flawed.

Although she tried, Yemi couldn’t seem to muster any physical attraction to him. And his chauvinistic remarks didn’t help with the repulsion she felt. This latest comment was the final nail in the coffin. No Bueno. She would rather remain single than be forced to continue to listen to this.

“Since you aren’t married yet, I take it nobody has passed your test,” Yemi said, her brain working fast on the best escape plan she could come up with in this situation without appearing rude.

“Not one woman. And It’s a shame,” Dare said, shaking his head in earnest disappointment. “Women of nowadays know nothing about keeping a home. That is why there is so much divorce in our society today.”

Yemi shook her head, flabbergasted. “Hmmm…so, you believe that not being able to cook a pot of soup with a thousand Naira is the reason for the increased divorce rate?”

“That’s not what I mean,” he objected.

“What exactly do you mean, then?”

“A stable marriage depends on simple things like that, a woman being able to manage money. My future wife has to know how to do that.”

“Of course, being able to manage money is a good quality,” Yemi agreed. “My problem with that comment is that in your opinion, the responsibility rests on the woman alone.”

“Yes, it does. A woman is the pillar of every home.”

Oh, lord. I’ll kill mum for this. Yemi couldn’t believe that her mother had tried to convince her this man would be a perfect fit for her. “He is one of the most sought after bachelors in my church,” she had said. Sought after for what? To aggravate women?

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Why romance authors should be taken seriously.

Hello everyone

I was excited to be interviewed by Syncity NG about the role of the romance genre in literature, particularly African literature.

One of the things I hated growing up, was the scarcity of contemporary romance with African main characters. When I was a teenager, I used to walk around the market and bookshops, desperately searching for romance books that had brown people who looked like me on the front covers. I was frequently disappointed because the only romance novels populating our bookstores were Mills and Boons with non-African main characters.

This made me yearn for more. When I came across the pacesetters series in the early 90s and authors like Helen Ovbiagele, who showcased romance in books like Evbu my Love and A Fresh Start, I went wild with excitement like a kid in a candy store. That day, I purchased almost all the books there with my pocket money.

Since then, I have come across other authors like Kiru Taye, Nana Prah, Empi Darko, Lara Daniels, Somi Ekhasomhi who write about love in Africa. I wanted to be a part of that.

Continue for my Interview with SynCity NG

Finalist at the Ufere Awards

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