Blind date disasters: Any deal breakers?

Hello everyone.

I’m currently working on a romance fiction novella. I wrote a scene yesterday that made me chuckle. It reminded me of a horrible blind date I experienced in Enugu, where the nice looking thirty-three year old man I was set up with, told me in a very serious voice that he would never marry a woman his mother didn’t approve of.

Now, I get that people have little mental tick boxes of what they can or can not accept in a future partner, but it was a first date and I didn’t feel it was appropriate telling me that the very first time we met. To be honest, it was a deal breaker for me. I think it’s because I worry about guys whose mothers influence majority of their decisions.

Have you ever had a horrible blind date? Care to share?

 Below is an excerpt of the scene I wrote. I hope you like it. (It’s not yet edited, so, be gentle.)

Gobsmacked, Yemi stared at the man in front of her, unable to believe what she just heard. Where does mum find these men?

“Pardon?” she asked, lowering her fork to her plate, her appetite suddenly diminished.

“I said, if a woman can’t cook a good pot of soup with a thousand Naira, she is not prepared to marry.”

Yemi laughed. “You are joking, right?” she said, lifting her cutlery piece again and digging into her plate of jollof rice. He had to be kidding. Surely, no person could say something so absurd without intending to be humorous.

“I am dead serious. I always set this test for women before I date them…to see if they are wife material,” Dare replied, smiling. His grin exposed perfectly shaped white teeth on a ruggedly handsome face. A shame. For someone so good-looking, his thinking process was gravely flawed.

Although she tried, Yemi couldn’t seem to muster any physical attraction to him. And his chauvinistic remarks didn’t help with the repulsion she felt. This latest comment was the final nail in the coffin. No Bueno. She would rather remain single than be forced to continue to listen to this.

“Since you aren’t married yet, I take it nobody has passed your test,” Yemi said, her brain working fast on the best escape plan she could come up with in this situation without appearing rude.

“Not one woman. And It’s a shame,” Dare said, shaking his head in earnest disappointment. “Women of nowadays know nothing about keeping a home. That is why there is so much divorce in our society today.”

Yemi shook her head, flabbergasted. “Hmmm…so, you believe that not being able to cook a pot of soup with a thousand Naira is the reason for the increased divorce rate?”

“That’s not what I mean,” he objected.

“What exactly do you mean, then?”

“A stable marriage depends on simple things like that, a woman being able to manage money. My future wife has to know how to do that.”

“Of course, being able to manage money is a good quality,” Yemi agreed. “My problem with that comment is that in your opinion, the responsibility rests on the woman alone.”

“Yes, it does. A woman is the pillar of every home.”

Oh, lord. I’ll kill mum for this. Yemi couldn’t believe that her mother had tried to convince her this man would be a perfect fit for her. “He is one of the most sought after bachelors in my church,” she had said. Sought after for what? To aggravate women?

You might also like:

Paper copies now available for purchase in Nigeria

Hello everyone,

I have excellent news to share!

Paper copies of Melodies of Love, Thorns and Roses and Starting Over Again can now be purchased in Nigeria. Yay!!!

I am so excited about this, because readers have asked me repeatedly to make them available in Nigeria. There is something about holding a book that some book lovers find fascinating. There are people who say that e- books don’t produce the same effect.

For me, as long as the story is enthralling, I don’t mind whatever form it comes in. I am like a book junkie—anything to fix my fiction craving will do.

Well, for those who prefer paper copies and find e-books inadequate, I have got you covered.

Enjoy a blissful romantic escape with this trilogy of sensual love stories from the heart of West Africa.

Just click the links below, order the paper copies and they will be delivered at your doorstep wherever you live in Nigeria. It is as simple as that.

Melodies of LoveClick here to buy Melodies Of Love

Thorns and RosesClick here to buy Thorns and Roses

Starting Over AgainClick here to buy Starting Over Again

 

Paper copies now available for purchase in Nigeria
You might also like:

Break-up scenes are such a thrill to write.

Hello everyone.

I am still in my writing cave and almost done with the first draft of another romance novel set in Abuja, Nigeria.

Yesterday, I wrote a break-up scene.

It amazed me just how much I enjoyed writing it, that I began thinking about the other times I relished penning down scenes with couple fights. I get such a thrill from those emotional and verbal altercations between lovers that it makes me wonder if I’m not a bit of a drama queen myself.

I’ll be honest and confess this; I love reading about couple catfights and watching it on TV, too.

One of my favourite TV scenes ever, was the quarrel between Rachel and Ross in ‘Friends’— when she found out he cheated on her with the girl who worked at the copier shop. It was so well written and acted, that I felt every emotion with the couple and could identify with both Ross and Rachel.

That remark “we were on a break,” from Ross, has stuck with me many years after watching it.

As a lover of romance novels and movies, I always enjoy a good emotional break-up scene.
Here’s a sneak peek of one in my work in progress. Hope you like it.

 

Ogonna rose abruptly, lifting her bag off the bed.

“Okay, then…” She made a move to walk past him.

Philip rushed to the door and slammed it shut, bracing himself against it.

“Step away, Phil. I want to leave,” she said.

“No!” Philip barked, broadening his stance, so she had no room to push him away. “We need to talk.”

“No, Phil. I have nothing else to say except, you can have her…”

“What? I don’t want her.”

“Do you think I’m stupid?”

“No, I don’t…Listen, please. I don’t know what Stella told you, but it’s not what you think…”

Ogonna burst into a mirthless laugh, interrupting Philip…

 

Rachel and Ross from “Friends”
One of my best scenes ever!
You might also like:

Nigerian Kobo Coins…Where did they disappear to?

Hello everyone. I hope you had a fabulous weekend. I did.

I bought a trampoline for the kids and set it up in our garden. They lost interest after only a few minutes, and I ended up jumping on it all day. Great to act like a child once again.

Okay, so, I am writing a love story set in Abuja, Nigeria. And in a dramatic scene, I wanted the characters to be distracted by loud sounds of metallic items dropping on a tiled floor.

The first thing that came to my mind was the jingle of coins falling out of a purse. It sounded perfect in my head until I remembered that coins are now rarely used in Nigeria.

That made me sad…

I halted my writing (My usual habit of procrastination), and searched the internet for old Nigerian coins, called Kobo.

I literary felt tearful thinking back about how in the 80s, my parents gave me and my siblings 10 kobo each every weekend to buy bubble gum and sweets. We each used to put our coins in a piggy bank to save for something special.

This is a part of our childhood that we cant pass to our children, because due to years of inflation and mismanagement of the economy, coins have almost completely disappeared from Nigeria.

To me, it is a big shame.

My father told me that when he was much younger, there were coins as low as 1 Kobo. I only got to experience using 10 kobo and upwards.

Right now, there are rarely any coins in Nigeria because they no longer have any value.

Do other African countries still use coins? Which countries?

Please comment about which denominations of the Nigerian kobo you spent.

Also comment if you’ve never seen a Nigerian Kobo.

I first spent 10 kobo. I miss those days.

Where are the Nigerian Kobo coins?
You might also like:

Teaser From Melodies Of Love

Hello everyone, here is a little teaser from my debut novel, Melodies Of Love, to keep you going for the rest of the week…Enjoy!

 

“Ikenna, my home is full of flowers. No more space,” she teased, glancing around her sitting room. “You need to stop.”

“What I need is to see you,Ada.”

“Ikenna, please—”

“Please what, Ada? … To not want you, to not pursue you?”

His voice remained calm, careful not to let her know exactly the kind of emotions he was experiencing. “I’m sorry, but I can’t do that Ada. I won’t do that.”

Adaora caught her breath. The possessive tone of his voice was difficult to ignore.

“I’ll give you till Monday to wrap your head around the fact that I want you.” He paused briefly, then added, “I will pursue you till you admit that you want me too.”

She was still speechless. Not daring to talk, to move.

Melodies Of Love by Amaka Azie

Available at the usual ebook retailers and as paper copies…

You might also like:

Coming soon to the RWOWA stand

#Comingsoon to the RWOWA stand this Sunday at #AfricaWrites2018.
These must read paperbacks 📚 Visit the RWOWA stand on Sunday, July 1, 2018 to grab your copies.
Venue: Africa Writes, The British Library, 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB

Join our Facebook event so we know you’ll be there. See link in profile 👆

See you there. 😊

@empibaryeh
@nanaprahauthor
@amaka.azie
@kirutaye

You might also like:

Well hello!

Have a wonderful and productive week ahead.
I’ve written six chapters already (11,120 words)
#motivated #newweek #productiveweek #foodporn #mondaymotivation

 
You might also like:

African books of the 80s and 90s

Drop the names of any Book from the Pacesetters publishers you remember below 👇🏾
#Pacesetters #amreading #africanbooks #africanliterature #flashbackfriday #tgif #weekendreading

You might also like:

Excerpt from Starting Over Again

“I know, mum, you always do,” Fejiro said with a smile, revealing a set of white teeth protruding from swollen gums. A telling evidence of the illness she suffered. Sickle cell disease. A sense of guilt gripped Onome. She blamed herself repeatedly for passing this faulty gene to Fejiro. Her throat tightened.
Onome vowed to do everything in her power to look after Fejiro. She would not allow sickle cell disease to defeat them.
#worldsicklecellday #sicklecell #sicklecellawareness #amreading #books#bookshelf #bookstagram #booksofinstagram #okadabooks #ibooks #kindle#nook #kobo #smashwords

 

You might also like: